All posts tagged: tea


Mullein, Cedar and Tangerine Peel: Simple Tea for the Lungs

  Sometimes simple is good A few months ago, I experienced a lingering cough after an case of influenza. When it was a stronger, more irritating cough, I treated it aggressively with Planetary Formulas’ Old Indian Wild Cherry Syrup (plus other things). It’s strong stuff, but when I have had bronchial infections it has historically helped so much that I go straight to it. After the worst of the cough was gone, I reached for a tea of three simple herbs which are easy to harvest and created a tea general tea for the lungs that’s quite delicious. Three Herb Tea for Promoting General Lung Function Mullein – Verbascum thapsus. Red Cedar –Thuja plicata. Dried Tangerine Peel – Citrus tangerina. 


Triple Rose and Lavender Sipping Tea

  I love making custom tea blends for people. Whether it’s an herbal sipping tea or a strong medicinal blend, there’s nothing like making a big batch of tea with someone in mind. One request was for a rose and lavender tea. Seems like simple enough directions, but when I tasted just the two herbs together, I felt like it needed depth and a variance of flavor. Those flowers competed with each other and needed to be tamed a bit. Triple Rose and Lavender 1 part Lavender flowers 1 part Rosebuds 2 parts Rose Hips 1/2 part hand-harvested Rose Petals The rose hips added a hint of sweet and tart, and gave the brewed tea a smoky rose color. Rose hips weighed down the floral and fragrant blossoms allowing the taste can linger on your palate, rather than float away to the ethers. I used to use rose hips sparingly, but now I use them in much higher proportions and appreciate the flavor and nourishment they offer as a medicinal food. I could’ve just used …


Tea of the Day: St. John’s Wort, Milky Oats and Chamomile Tea for the Center

  Here’s a gentle and tasty tea combining some of my favorite herbs to support the all-important brain-gut connection. It works on the nervous system and the middle jiao (digestion) to move Qi and ease stomach aches, increase healthy permeability and absorption in the gut, calms the emotions especially anxiety, is tonifying to worn-out adrenals, warms and increases circulation.

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Elderberry, a Worthy Add to Herbal Teas

When I worked at a co-op in the health and body care section, I noticed that every year around November, bottles and bottles of elderberry products would fly off the shelves. Elderberry has earned a reputation as a cold and flu herb, especially for the dreaded influenza, and rightfully so. It packs a powerful punch of anthocyanadins, helps the immune system do this. Studies have shown that it is effective at reducing the length of the flu by half. Yet like most herbs, elderberry has depth and can be used in many situations.

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Day 1 Tea – Yarrow, Peony and Raspberry Tea for, well, Day 1

Day 1 Tea: a lower jiao warming, blood and Ki Qi nourishing and ever-so-slightly Blood moving herbal tea. I made it originally to ease menstrual cramps, starting with Yarrow as my chief herb. I have had this blend around for a while, but am sharing it with a customer for the first time and really, like really, enjoying making a new batch. I am using a mix of purchased rosebuds and rose petals I have harvested from Portland. Milky oats have been added to support the Kidneys (capital ‘K’ means a Chinese medicine concept and function), because I originally made this for someone with dysmennorhea with underlying Kidney Qi Xu (Deficiency), and I find Milky Oats to support the adrenals quite nicely. Grains are also mineral-rich, which can help reduce crampy pain and spasms. Sometimes during day 1 or longer, digestion can be messed up. Loose stools, upset stomach, crampy intestines along with the uterus. It is not fun. Milky Oats can help soothe the digestive tract, too. Let’s see…what other glorious herbs are in …


Reviving Skullcap and Milky Oat Tea

I’d like to share one of my favorite tea blends featuring skullcap and milky oats, two of my favorite herbs for reviving the nervous system. I like them individually as simples and do most of the time, but I also think they work well as a pair. Just the two of them, skullcap and milky oats, isn’t the best tasting tea I have ever had. I don’t mind them separately, but together? They need some depth, some warmth, some support and some flavor. Before I say more, take a look at the ingredients: 2 milky oats 1-2 skullcap 1 lemon balm 2 spearmint 1 chamomile 1/2 rosemary .25 ginger 1 rose hips 1 orange peel I still struggle with what to call this tea. I first blended a variety of it for a friend of a friend, a new mom who was getting a little frazzled with the demands (and joys!) of a newborn on just a few hours of sleep each day. This mom’s birth was on the long side (40 hours or so), …


A tea when everything’s perfect

Why do I use herbs more when I am sick then when I am well? Perhaps because most of what I know about herbs came from reading about how to help the body in times of illness. At the point at or just prior to the start of a health imbalance, I reach out for more pointed botanical support and either restore vitality or get sick, convalesce and then restore vitality. Herbs help us regain a sense of wholeness, or offer something we are lacking. Even the herbs I use preventativly to build reserves, like the nourishing, vitamin- and mineral-rich plants like nettle, raspberry leaf, alfalfa or even supportive roots such as dandelion, burdock and yellow dock to give me something. Of course, there is nothing inherently wrong with the quest for support, well-being, and wholeness. It’s kinda part of the whole point of herbalism. Indeed, there is an inherent need to be engaged with consistently taking care of ourselves with food, rest, exercise and so on, just to make it through the day (otherwise …


Medicine Making – Lunar Infusions

If solar infusions utilize flavor to accentuate medicinal qualities, then lunar infusions (or moon teas) add an element of ritual and seasonality. Ritual can take place in many ways, but in all cases, ritual involves conscious intention. Lunar infusions naturally add an element of dreaming, introspection, quietness to the tea. Lunar infusions are definitely more yin and receptive, and the qualities can be influenced by the phase of the moon, too. I can’t say the words “lunar” and “herbs” in the same sentance and not think of the Artemisias! Mugwort, wormwood, sweet Annie, tarragon, sagebrush, southernwood… those silver-y, upward pointing trident-like leaves seem very moon-like. Not to mention the whole being named after Artemis thing. That calls for another post down the road! My favorite early summer moon tea for dreaming is quite simple: a few mugwort leaves a few violet leaves and flowers a sprig of California poppy Find a still spot out of doors to steep your tea. Set your intention. Add the herbs to a glass jar after sundown, fill with water. …