Chamomile Scores and mexico levitra Woes

July 2nd, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

chamomile-harvest

Each year my garden sprouts more and more chamomile. It comes earlier each year, too. This year it was all done by the end of June.

This leaves a shorter harvest time, and unfortunately I can’t tend my garden in Gresham as much I have been able to in the past. This means a few long harvesting days rather than a constant, steady harvest in better bite-sized chunks (which I prefer).  This also means that a lot of my chamomile went to seed before I could get to it. » Read the rest of this entry «

Juniper Berry Bath

September 20th, 2010 § 2 comments § permalink

Sometimes your favorite herbal concoctions come out of nowhere. One day a woman came into the http://iowa-apa.org/discount-drug-viagra herb shop with an ambiguous book under her arm called something like “Herbal Cleansing” and a list of canadian pharmacy levitra generic'>canadian pharmacy levitra generic about twenty herbs she needed for a such a cleanse. Hours after I helped this person with her herbs, I found a little scrap of paper with a formula called simply “Detox Bath”. It sounded so yummy I made it up right then and tried it out that evening. I call it “Refreshing Bath”, because I feel renewed after a soak in its freshness.

Refreshing Bath

  • 1 part Juniper berries, ground coarsely
  • 1 part Rosemary, coarsely cut
  • 1 part Calendula or comfrey
  • 2 parts Peppermint

Directions: Steep 3/4 cup herbs in 6 cups just boiled water, covered, for 30 mins. Strain. Add to fda approves levitra bath and adjust water temp.

Alternate directions: Tie 3/4 cup herbs in a thin cotton flour sack towel or place in a muslin bag, position under the faucet, and run hot water through to “steep”. Adjust water temperature, soak and enjoy.

Juniper (Juniperus communis) is an antiseptic diuretic rich in volatile oils and tannins. By itself, juniper is follow link buying real cialis without prescription quite strong, but luckily it blends well with other cooler aromatic herbs. And no, it does NOT smell like gin, gin smells like juniper! Juniper is not recommended for internal use during pregnancy or severe kidney infections or disease (you don’t want to over-stimulate delicate kidneys) and I would extend those basic guidelines to external use.

Calendula (Calendula officinalis) and comfrey (Symphytum officinale) are great herbs to add to just about any bath because of their topical healing properties. Pick one, or both. I often choose calendula because it adds color to the mix (quite beautiful with dark purple juniper berries!) and is a gentle lymphatic. The other herbs in the recipe, rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and peppermint (Mentha piperita) are wonderfully aromatic and stimulating members of the mint family that add to the experience.

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