All posts tagged: compost

southernwood

Growing Power!

I am so excited I can hardly sit still. This past weekend, through the generosity of the Duluth Community Garden Program, I attended the amazing workshop “Growing Your Community Food System from the Ground Up” at Growing Power in Milwaukee, WI. If you haven’t heard of the radicle things that Growing Power is doing then check out their site. In particular, scroll down the webpage and click on the “Good Food Manifesto For America” link to read about their philosophy and mission. Their greenhouses are spacious and packed to the brim, with five levels of production (starting five feet below the ground with perch and tilapia aquaponics to pots hanging from the rafters) and compost and worms everywhere. Outside are have goats, ducks, chickens, turkeys and of course, bees. Growing Power is successful at producing food for their community members as well as retailers. Half of money brought in is from what they make from production (year round microgreens, salad greens, compost, worms and worm castings). Less reliance on grants/endowments = sustainable economics. Just about …

Create a Garden

Fall is a perfect time to prepare a garden bed for next year’s season. Over the winter, the prepared bed will decompose, leaving you with fertile soil ready for planting in the spring. Using this “lasagna” method will eliminate the need to dig up turf, fertilize, or pull weeds like mad next year. Cardboard is much more beneficial than the typically chosen black plastic, as it decomposes while eliminating weeds and turf. Comfrey is chosen because of its superb nutrient content and decomposability. The soil will be fertile with minerals like calcium, potassium, phosphorus and iron, and more. The first step is to place carefully cleaned (no packing tape pr staples) and cut cardboard directly onthe surface you wish to transform into a bed. Cover this with over an inch or compost (unfinished works just fine). Add some leaves over the prepared dirt. Gather more than a few handfuls of comfrey from your local source (Duluth has three that I know of) and layer over the leaves. If you cannot find comfrey, use another source …