Warm Surface-Releasing Herbs – East + West

April 9th, 2011 § 4 comments § permalink

The first groups of herbs students learn in Chinese herb classes are the warm and rbrichardconstruction.com cool herbs to release the exterior. These herbs are active on the surface of the body and useful in externally-contracted conditions, like colds or the http://wisehat.com/viagra-mexico flu. Many are diaphoretic and open the pores to cheap viagra on line promote sweating, vent rashes, treat red, itchy eyes and sore throat in the case of a wind-cold or heat invasion, treat headache of subversiones.org carious causes, or drain dampness by being diuretic.

One thing I love, love, love, love, love about learning Chinese herbs is the emphasis on the energetics of taste/flavor. I already mentioned this in my last post, but I can’t help but (over)state it again, because it has been so helpful in learning the herbs, and providing a bit of theory to base the use of these herbs in.

Overall, the flavor and energy of these herbs goes up and out. Some are aromatic, most are acrid, a few are bitter or sweet. Most but not all of these herbs enter the Bladder and/or the Lungs, since these are the organs most closely related to the generic cialis canada exterior (Lungs in the upper body, the Bladder in the lower body). Below I have taken a few herbs from the texts and added a few Western herbs from Micheal Tierra’s The Way of the Herbs, for comparison.

Warm herbs to release the exterior/surface:

EphedraEphedra sinica, Ephedracae family. This herb is classified as  warm, acrid, and slightly bitter, and is known as a one of try it cialis cheap the best diaphoretics when there is no sweating as it opens the pores when it is blocked by wind-cold. It is also used for asthma or cough, as well as edema since it is a diuretic. It is no accident that it is the first herb often taught; it exemplifies the entire category in many ways even though it is somewhat of a controversial herb and only for you buy viagra online canadian phamacy not used often in the states.

There are many representatives from the Apiacea or carrot family, but I want to look at an herb from the Chinese materia medica that has a close relative in Western herbalism, angelica.  Angelica dahurica or bai zhi is warm, acrid and aromatic, which makes it useful for dispersing, unblocking, warming and drying. These qualities are useful draining skin infections like boils, treating leukorrhea, frontal headaches and toothaches due to an attack of external cold-wind, and nasal congestion.

Every herb has at least on of the twelve channels that it enters into, but a few herbs actually guide into the organ itself. Bai zhi guides into the Yang Ming organs, in particular the Stomach. This makes sense because the paired organs of Spleen and Stomach often accumulate dampness and affect the appitite, assim diegstion, and bai zhi is how to get cialis'>how to get cialis great at expelling dampness. 

Angelica archangelica is also in this category. It is native to Europe has similar energetics to bai zhi, and is known as being carminative, emmenagogue and diaphoretic. Taken during the hotelpacificparadise.com start of a cold or the flu, it can promote sweating and www.sthelenas1712.org spread warmth through the body. To me it is especially useful in either damp conditions or damp environments, because it is so aromatic and lifting. I recall a teacher commenting that it is suited to www.aedian.com England, where it is cold and damp. I started using it after spending a weekend in southern Minnesota where it was dew-covered and growing abundantly along the steep roadsides during a very hot and very humid June.  I was drawn to use it because of its drying and carminative properties, and found it worked incredibly well in this regard.

magenta hedge-nettle variety on www.universitypharmacy.ca the Oregon coast

Many aromatic, warming and spicy mints show up in this category from the Chinese tradition as well as Western. Hyssop, sage, hedge nettle, basil, thyme, oregano, savory, monarda, perilla and fang feng are a few examples. When I thought of cardwellbeach.com the Western herbs in the category,  I realized that many herbs in surface-releasing category are anti-microbial. Chinese medicine theory doesn’t include germ theory, but it does consider that exogenous pathogenic factors can invade the body when either it’s defenses are down (a deficiency situation) or the pathogen is very strong (an excess condition).

Mints are among my favorite herbs to take at the start of a cold or flu, or even when in chronic conditions when it has moved into the chest (thyme being my standby here). They have the ability to float and the best choice discount levitra online vent a congested head, increase circulation, promote circulation and sweating, and even soothe an upset stomach and promote a good appetite, which is often lacking when you are coming down with a cold or flu. I mentioned this to my herb study group a few weeks ago and they were taken aback by my use of thyme for a cold, saying it was awfully hot and caustic. I countered with explaining that I am used to below zero winters so I needed a lot of warming, but that still didn’t win them over. Finally it came up that they thought I was using the essential oil of thyme which is very hot, concentrated and often caustic. But I am a whole herb for my steam sort of gal.

A few other herbs in this category include sassafrass, fresh ginger, cinnamon cassia and two ligusticums: L. sinense and L. porteri. One of my favorite Chinese herbs in the category is qiang huo, Notopterygium incisum. The root of this aromatic Apiaceae is warm, acrid and bitter so it can disperse and wow it's great cheapest cialis prices raise to discharge wind, cold and damp pathogens from the exterior. Qiang huo enters the levitra sale Bladder channel, which combined with its lifting and dispersing flavors, can release sore muscles, chills and headache. In particular, it relieves achy joints and bones along the back, the muscles along the sides of the spine (erector spinae), along the scapula, up the back of very good site best online generic levitra the neck into the head and across the forehead to the eyes.

I wish would’ve had some qiang huo on hand when I was a preschool teacher and came down with the achy flu from hell 4 times in 3 months. My bones felt like they were in a vice and I was chilled to http://innermeangirl.com/buy-cialis-in-canada-no-prescription the bone. I used a lot of diapohretics and we choice cialis pfizer india warm herbs, but came to rely on boneset for the pain in my hips and femurs. Boneset is so bitter and cold, which brought it down to the lower burner, but it didn’t totally relieve the aches in my shoulders, arms and back – what qiang huo does so well.

Asarum canadense growing abundently in a Minnesota state park


 

Aromatic Digestives & Carminatives

December 13th, 2007 § 1 comment § permalink

What is viagra profesional'>viagra profesional a bitter user to do when she realizes they are too cold for her? Reach for the warm side of digestive remedies!

Aromatic digestives are to be used for cold conditions, along with “circulatory stimulants as wells as ‘warming’ expectorants” for congestive dyspepsia, gas and belching, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and colic, often with a white slippery or sticky coat on the tongue, depressed circulation, copious urine, respiratory congestion, and arthritis as seen in cold-dampness affecting the digestion (Mills 423-4, 430). Both bitters and aromatic digestives stimulate the real cialis without a prescription'>real cialis without a prescription appetite, and act on assimilation of food in the digestive track, both work on “dampness” (cold-damp and damp-heat, respectively).

Carminatives are rich in volatile oils, relax the stomach thus relieving gas, and stimulate peristalsis of the digestive system. In some herbals carminatives and robertlinnemann.com aromatics are grouped together. Both contain herbs that have strong yet pleasant tastes and odors, and are used to “flavor” and “warm up” medicinal blends. No wonder I like to add cinnamon and cardamom to practically every herbal formula! And no wonder that most of these are used as culinary herbs the world ’round. Below are some common aromatics and carminatives.

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) is a great illustration of a warming carminative which “harmonizes digestive functions” including digestive weakness (even debility with anorexia), gas, belching, and basically any epigastric problem that is relieved with pressure or heat (425).

Another common example is cardamom (Amomum cardamomum), with it’s strong warming action on “congestive digestion with abdominal pain and distention, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting” (427). When fatigue and weakness seem related to poor food assimilation, cardamom is indicated because it is thoroughly warming without being too stimulating (which can further weaken the person). Mills says it has traditionally been used in difficulties during pregnancy due to digestion and best place cialis weakness.

    Angelica (Angelica archangelica) illustrates that carminatives/aromatics can be effective in respiratory  congestion.  Mills ventures to http://innermeangirl.com/buy-levitra-australia say that “there is probably no better convalescent remedy in the Western materia medica” (412). Its not a far-off statement when one considers that angelica not only warms the digestion, soothes intestinal overactivity, stimulates appetite (useful for anorexia), but is also an expectorant for coughs and bronchitis (Hoffmann, 175). I use the tincture when my chest is sore during a cold, with or without a cough. It seems to relieve the tension not by relaxation but by the warming sensation.

    Warmer yet than angelica is cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum). In Chinese formulas, one use ofCinnamon cinnamon is levitrabest levitra to warm the cialis buy now'>cialis buy now interior, which is a different than a diaphoretic. It is both carminative and astringent due to tannins, so it can be used for tonifying the digestion and “as a symptomatic treatment for diarrhea” (Mills 413). Like angelica, it can be used for feverish conditions, and at the start of a chest cold (with fresh ginger) to prevent chest infections (413).

    Dill‘s (Anethum graveolens) anti-spasmodic action makes it an excellent choice for colic in children. It has starred in my Gripe Waters over the years. Also has been the supporting actor in formulas that increase breast milk flow.

    Anise (Pimpinella anisum) is also anti-spasmodic an aromatic like dill, and is also an expectorant. Use it with colic and gas, as well as in irritable coughs and bronchitis (Hoffmann 176). In Indian restaurants you may find candied anise and fennel seeds to snack on http://www.universitypharmacy.ca/viagra-online-usa after-meal–especially useful when you ate too much creamy masala.

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale), a known soothing carminative with diaphoretic and stimulant properties, promotes circulation, warms the chills, promotes perspiration during fevers and soothes upset stomachs. Keep on hand flu season. Wonderfully effective for reversing phlegm conditions and coughs–use with garlic (Mills 420),

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