Latest Posts


Feverfew and the Headache


This summer I grew Feverfew for the first time, in a pot with Mexican Oregano and Dusty Miler. It grew well, and tolerated frequent harvest of its flowers and leaves for tincturing, sprouting new buds and growth many times. I hope it comes up next year so I can enjoy it all over again.

Feverfew had always confused me. I rarely heard it used for any other use besides migraines, and since I rarely experience migraines or headaches myself or treat many headaches, I didn’t gain experience with it. It seems that there were differing opinion about it. Some said it was only good for headaches with specific indications, some said to take it as a prophylaxis daily for any sort of migraine. Some said it was overrated and some said it was highly reliable. Read More


Sneak Peak: New Products for the Shop



New products soon to be in the shop!

I am really excited to add a new herbal face care line. I have been using my own face toner, steam and oil serum for years now, so it feels good to finally perfect my formulas (for the time being, at least) and offer them in the shop.

Another addition will be a nourishing hair oil, with jojoba oil. I love jojoba oil, it is so luxurious and is notably a little different from other oils as it seems to lock in moisture and balance oil production with long term use. At first I was concerned it would build up on the hair, but I haven’t found this to be the case at all. From my experience, it seems that waxes tend to build up, not oils.

I also have a Cedarwood and Fir deodorizing body spray. Even though the scent is on the masculine side, I find myself wearing it almost daily. I just can’t get enough of that cedar scent. Read More


Tea of the Day: St. John’s Wort, Milky Oats and Chamomile Tea for the Center



Here’s a gentle and tasty tea combining some of my favorite herbs to support the all-important brain-gut connection. It works on the nervous system and the middle jiao (digestion) to move Qi and ease stomach aches, increase healthy permeability and absorption in the gut, calms the emotions especially anxiety, is tonifying to worn-out adrenals, warms and increases circulation. Read More

collosseum tree

Olea europaea: Olive Trees in Rome


arch olive treeI have just returned from an Italian vacation. Oh, the sights, the food, the plants and the ruins to be seen! One particular plant seen all over the place happens to be one of utmost importance: the Olive tree. Olive trees are all over the place. From afar they are easy to identify because of their round, squat crown and their distinctive pale silvery-green foliage. Read More


Herb Samples: A Most Useful Study Aid

The last 4 weeks have been a whirl-wind. But I made out out on the other side! Yes, I officially graduated.

My last board exam was the herbal one. I spent a week doing practice tests, reading through my notes and fondling my samples. My herb samples came from the free table at school. Some samples were missing, some had pre-made notes and some had lost their, um, freshness, but I didn’t care. They did the trick. It is much easier to memorize things when the thing you have to memorize is in your hands, or at least it is for me. I would’ve preferred to taste each one individually, see it growing, learn the botany, chemistry and ethnobotanic history in an attempt to really learn it. How much can you know about a plant by just reading about it? A lot, true, but so much can be gleaned experientially. Read More


Additional Places to Connect

I wish I could spend more time on this blog. I dream about all the things I want to explore and share and ask about herbs and health. Most everyday I am jotting down inspirations and taking photos of the the herbal apothecary that trail my shadow.

Luckily a major shift in my schedule and life is approaching; I will graduate grad school on August 30th. That’s less than two months away! I cannot wait to 1) rejuvenate and 2) pursue my herbal interests 4) connect with family and friends and 3) go to Italy in September and Wisconsin in October.

So in the mean time, I want want to share some of the other places I am seen frequenting.

During the month of April, I took an Etsy vacation. I closed my shop down and focused on exploring herbs in a different, more personal way. In April I also started second blog about plants, flowers, and the Portland area. You can check it out here: Fall Into Place Blog. It was supposed to be a month of internet reduction, but the need to take photos of flowers overcame.

I have a Tumblr page for Kyra Botanica : You can find my plant-obsessed Pinterest page here:kyrabotanica. And when I remember, I post photos on Instagram: celia_jean. and as kyrabotanica.







Chamomile Scores and Woes

Each year my garden sprouts more and more chamomile. It comes earlier each year, too. This year it was all done by the end of June.

This leaves a shorter harvest time, and unfortunately I can’t tend my garden in Gresham as much I have been able to in the past. This means a few long harvesting days rather than a constant, steady harvest in better bite-sized chunks (which I prefer).  This also means that a lot of my chamomile went to seed before I could get to it. Read More


Poppy Explosion

What is it about poppies?

I don’t get them, but as if I’m entitled to understanding. They are so tender, fragile, delicate, finicky. Their petals are like tissue paper and their fuzzy buds look like they could barely be supported by their thread-like stem. One little bump and the plant falls over. But yet they contain some incredibly powerful medicine, and not just the opium poppy but many plants in the family (Corydalis, California Poppy for two). Read More