Where Do We Go Now? Searching for Herbal Integration

November 19th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

shoes-florence-garden

shoes-florence-gardenWhat’s your herbal story? How did you get here? What lessons are hidden in this journey to the plants, to nature and surfeldorado.com to herbal medicine?

If you are like me, you have been asking yourself these and many other questions about how you fit in the grand scheme of this calling of working with the http://www.antiracismfascism.org/buy-levitra-on-the-internet herbs. » Read the rest of this entry «

Keeping Busy and Shots From the Herb Nook

August 11th, 2013 § 2 comments § permalink

herb-nook-inner-classic-and-plants

I am almost done with school; 3 weeks until graduation. My heart is bursting with joy. As the end nears, I find myself needing some reflection, processing, integrating and closure at my experience, so please forgive this semi-gushy personal post. » Read the rest of this entry «

Additional Places to Connect

July 18th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

rose-petals-on-dish

I wish I could spend more time on this blog. I dream about all the things I want to explore and share and ask about herbs and health. Most everyday I am jotting down inspirations and levitra no rx required'>levitra no rx required taking photos of the the herbal apothecary that trail my shadow.

Luckily a major shift in my schedule and life is approaching; I will graduate grad school on August 30th. That’s less than two months away! I cannot wait to 1) rejuvenate and 2) pursue my herbal interests 4) connect with family and friends and 3) go to Italy in September and Wisconsin in October.

So in the mean time, I want want to share some of the other places I am seen frequenting.

During the month of April, I took an Etsy vacation. I closed my shop down and focused on exploring herbs in a different, more personal way. In April I also started second blog about plants, flowers, and the Portland area. You can check it out here: Fall Into Place Blog. It was supposed to be a month of internet reduction, but the cialis tablets need to take photos of flowers overcame.

I have a Tumblr page for Kyra Botanica : bo-tan-ica.tumblr.com. You can find my plant-obsessed Pinterest page here:kyrabotanica. And when I remember, I post photos on Instagram: celia_jean. and as kyrabotanica.

 

 

 

 

 

April around the bend

March 30th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

Screen Shot 2013-03-30 at 10.44.24 PM

Two important changes are in store for April 1st for me. It is the beginning of Spring term for my grad program. Winter term is always the most difficult one of the year, so to start Spring term means I made it through the hard part… here’s to a new start and industriaelsalvador.com forward motion. » Read the rest of this entry «

My Favorite Neighborhood Empty Lot

August 13th, 2012 § 0 comments § permalink

plantain-huge

Abandoned houses can be found everywhere. Bad for the economy, yes; but very good for herbalists! » Read the rest of this entry «

Eastern Oregon Adventure

July 30th, 2012 § 0 comments § permalink

» Read the rest of this entry «

Herbed Olive Oil + Color Study

July 12th, 2012 § 1 comment § permalink

Color can tell us a lot. In just a minuet or two of observation, some subtleties about a plant can come forward. » Read the rest of this entry «

Spring Growth

April 10th, 2012 § 2 comments § permalink

Grape Hyacinth – Muscari armeniacum

» Read the rest of this entry «

Reviving Skullcap and Milky Oat Tea

May 19th, 2011 § 8 comments § permalink

Skullcap Om Loose Leaf Herbal Tea Blend 2 oz
I’d like to share one of my favorite tea blends featuring skullcap and milky oats, two of my favorite herbs for reviving the nervous system. I like them individually as simples and do most of the time, but I also think they work well as a pair. Just the http://cardwellbeach.com/female-ingestion-of-viagra two of them, skullcap and milky oats, isn’t the best tasting tea I have ever had. I don’t mind them separately, but together? They need some depth, some warmth, some support and some flavor. Before I say more, take a look at the ingredients:
  • 2 milky oats
  • 1-2 skullcap
  • 1 lemon balm
  • 2 spearmint
  • 1 chamomile
  • 1/2 rosemary
  • .25 ginger
  • 1 rose hips
  • 1 orange peel
I still struggle with what to call this tea. I first blended a variety of it for a friend of a friend, a new mom who was getting a little frazzled with the demands (and joys!) of a newborn on just a few hours of sleep each day. This mom’s birth was on the long side (40 hours or so), so she was exhausted from the get-go. Plus, she was selling her house, moving and remodeling the new one. Basically, this woman needed some nervous system support, with manifestations of feeling wired and tired simultaneously. For her I called it “De-Stress Tea”, and she reported in after about 2 weeks that her stress and click here levitra australia exhaustion was declining, and she was starting to feel like her old self.
This tea also typifies a student burning the candle at both ends, so I have called it simply “Students Tea”. There’s a lot of mental energy being used as a student, not to mention late nights of studying (and/or partying). It is a delicate act to balance school, a social life, family, work and self-care.
Now I call it “Skullcap Om”, because of the chilled-out feeling I get from drinking skullcap.  Buddhists monks use skullcap to prepare for mediation, and it has the http://www.mwi.pl/cheap-viagra-with-fast-delivery ability to stimulate and relax at the same time. Skullcap clears the mind from circular thoughts – which become especially apparent when you are trying to fall asleep. Sometimes, this over-thinking is the only thing that prevents sleep; my body may be totally heavy and relaxed, ready for sleep, but the mind races on. I say that it stimulates because I become more aware of my senses, and my body wakes up and comes into present time. Here’s a little something I wrote about skullcap a while back.
The four members of the mint family featured in this tea, skullcap, lemon balm, spearmint and rosemary, are well-known nervines. I love bringing mints together in a tea, especially picked fresh from the garden. That being said, I don’t want to drink only mints all the time, since as a group they are light, airy and cool. I happen to be light, airy and cool myself, so I need a little ginger, cinnamon, licorice, fennel and levitra daily the like to anchor that dispersing mint nature. Combining them with the sunny sweetness of another nervine, chamomile, adds a little variety to the aromatic mints and directs the cardwellbeach.com tea towards the middle burner/digestion.
Rose hips , ginger and orange peel are added for flavor, but they also direct the tea around the body a bit, orange peel and ginger again with affinities for the belly. I am not sure where rose hips would ‘go’ in the body, the heart maybe, blood vessels? I hesitate because I haven’t figured rose hips out yet. They are a bit sour and sweet, and thus astringe and tone, they are chock-full of nutrients in true red berry style, add color to an otherwise plain green tea, and they taste delicious. What don’t they do?
Milky oats (the tops of the oat (Avena sativa) plant harvested while in the “milky” stage) is a great restorative, for the brain, emotions and body alike. I love, love, love oats. When I was interning at an herbal retreat center, I bought a half pound of locally grown milky oats and cialis online switzerland'>cialis online switzerland drank a quart of the tea every day. The milky oats (combined with the luxury of working in a herb garden at the top of a mountain for three months) completely revived my energy, body and emotions.

I bring this tea up because I need it right now! My brain is on overload, so much that I can’t seem to muster the energy to make this tea for myself. With doing this post, I am reminded of the strengthening these herbs bring to a worn-out system.

 

 

Southern Blood Types

February 12th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Sweet Fern

Learning herbalism is one things; learning pathology is quite another. Just today I was struck yet again with the realization that I can study what herbs do until I am blue in the face, but what good is it if I don’t know when to apply them? It’s an ongoing process to be certain, but one thing is quite useful for this; learning energetic qualities.

Southern blood typology is interesting because it is an energetic system that is rooted in a physical phenomena, blood. Even though blood is quite tangible as a life-giving substance, here it is infused in energetic language and symbols. It makes me think of what I’ve learned about Yin (blood) and Yang (energetic) being both mutually dependent and ever transforming and flowing into each other. Speaking of Chinese medicine, many of the Southern blood classifications share similarities with TCM, like blood deficiency, heat in the blood, and so on. Again, I have to direct you to my list of references (Wood in particular, as this is mostly taken from him), because there is a decent amount of information out there about Southern herbalism.

There are a number of variations of Southern blood typology. A system currently in use by herbal practitioners in and out of the south contains the most adjectives and thus gives rise to more individualized diagnostic and treatment options. Basic blood classifications includes the locations (high or low), viscosity (thin or thick), an overall cleanliness (clean or dirty, synonymous with good or bad), and flavor (bitter or sweet). Other systems may also include temperature of the blood, (hot or cold), speed (slow or fast), or a combination of any of these qualities. For example, sweet blood may be included under high blood (Mathews, 888) and can be treated with bitter herbs to lower the blood from the head, neck and best quality levitra'>best quality levitra chest to the center of the body. The system illustrated below places sweet blood as cause of thick blood, as excessive amounts of sugar in the blood may contribute to high cholesterol (Wood, 24). Just as the sap flows unconstricted in the warmth of summer, thin, high, hot and fast blood as associated with summer, while cold, low, thick and slow blood are more likely to come up during winter.

Good or clean blood is the state of blood in healthy, strong and vibrant people. It is the state of blood resulting from a good constitution married with healthy lifestyle habits and choices. Herbal tonics are consumed daily and adjusted seasonally to keep the good state of blood stay where it is, like ‘seng (ginseng), sassafras and sarsaparilla.
Bad or dirty blood contains various chemicals (a modern concept), impurities or waste products.  It is called “dirty” or “toxic” in popular natural commerce. Alterative herbs like burdock, dandelion, yellow dock, as well as lymphatic herbs like poke, red clover or echinacea can be used to clean the blood. The bitter flavor is also an important blood cleanser, as seen in the role of spring tonics and buy cialis without prescription'>buy cialis without prescription salad greens, especially important after the winter, a time of dirty, thick or slow blood easily accumulates toxins.

High blood is located high in the body, accumulating and causing pressure in the head, face or neck. It can also mean high blood pressure and refers to high volume of blood. It is not uncommon to hear people in the south refer to high blood pressure as “high blood”. In its past, Western medicine used blood letting to release high blood. Accounts from the turn of the last century of traditional herbs used for lowering the blood included sassafrass, wild cherry, onions and garlic (Cavender, 123), while modern herbalist use diaphoretics that release the surface and soothes capillaries, like yarrow, hawthorn, peach leaves, vervain, angelica and aspirin (Wood).

Anemia or malnutrition are clinical manifestations of low blood, which can be due to blood that is lacking vitality and is low in volume, low in the body or low in pressure. Fatigue and viagra online pharmacy usa'>viagra online pharmacy usa looking ‘peaked’ are symptoms of low blood, as is dizziness upon standing (Cavender, 124). Blood builders and things that raise the blood, stimulate circulation and tone the veins are used in modern practice. Traditional remedies include cooking on iron pans, adding iron nails to water pitchers, as was eating spring greens and taking a compound of molasses and sulfur (Cavender, 124).
Thin blood is somewhat related to low blood, but it is more watery and occurs in thin and cold people. Frequent bruising, clammy skin, frequent urination and http://celebrifan.com/soft-gel-levitra having a blue or purple tinge to the skin are common manifestations of thin blood (Wood, 22). Warming angelica or feverfew can be helpful to increase the circulation, while astringents like raspberry leaf, red root, rose hips are herbs useful as they tone the tissues and stop the leakage of fluid.

Thick blood is sometimes called oily blood. It can be caused by excess fat, sugar and other metabolites in the blood or when waste products from bad blood accumulate and coagulate. Blood viscosity is reduced, leading to stroke, heart attack, high cholesterol and obesity (24-25). Treatments for thick blood are many and share treatments with other blood conditions (especially high blood). Often alteratives are used, along with blood thinners (a bioregional favorite is tulip poplar), cooling fruits like huckleberry and aromatic circulatory stimulants like yarrow, safflower, angelica and sassafras.


Fast blood
is related to hot blood, with the most obvious symptom being a racing heart beat. Hyperthyroidism and http://industriaelsalvador.com/best-price-for-generic-levitra chronic stress can be present with fast blood, along with nervous energy or anxiousness. Sedatives are used to calm the nervous system, like poplar bark, motherwort, or hops; stronger antiseptics like figwort, echinacea and baptisia have been traditionally used in chronic, stagnant cases or with throbbing infections or pain (27).
Slow blood develops over a long time, due to chronic influences” (27), and is a more severe form of bad blood often with additional causative factors of cold, low or thick blood. Basically the vitality of the blood has been worn down, whether from constitutional weakness chronic or severe disease. Herbal treatments will vary according to the individual and the reason slow blood developed.
Hot blood can include fevers, infections or rashes, as well as a general hot constitution. Cold blood is similarly obvious in its’ meaning; it refers to states of coldness whether it be due to chills, spasms, arthritis or stiffness. Both hot blood and cold blood cross over a bit from their obvious naturalistic meanings of tending to excess heat and coldness respectively to the psychological realm. At the extremes, hot blooded people anger easily, have violent tendencies and live excessive lifestyles, while cold people are seen as tense, removed and are capable of premeditated crime (28-9).

Sources:

Cavender, Anthony. Folk Medicine in Southern Appalachia.
Light, Phyllis. “Southern herbalism: Southern Herbalism, My Story”. An article from: New Life Journal [eDoc/Amazon Short].
Light, Phyllis. Lecture notes: Southern Folk Herbalism. 2007.
Matthews, Holly F. “Rootwork: Description of Ethnomedical System in the South.” Southern Medical Journal, July 1987, Vol. 80, No. 7.
Wood, Matthew. The Earthwise Herbal: A Complete Guide to New World Medicinal
Plants.

A bit on Southern Herbalism

February 7th, 2011 § 0 comments § permalink

Passionflower - Passaflora incarnata

With all the pertinent issues in modern American herbalism, like endanger species, failing health care system, drug companies, FDA regulations, GMO’s and GMP’s, it still is a great time to be in this field, as a student, participant and it's cool generic online cialis practitioner. One thing I am particularly grateful for is the plethora of learning opportunities, like classes, blogs, seminars, home-study courses, videos, recordings, conferences, and so on.

A few years ago, I took a class with Matthew Wood and Phylis Light. As soon as they started discussing Southern folk herbalism, I was enthralled with the regional flavor that and the South brought to herbalism. It has also gained a new appreciation for the Southern herbs I adore like passionflower, peach leaves and sassafras.  Here is a little bit of what I have pieced together about the background of Southern herbalism, after listening to Light, reading Wood’s Earthwise Herbal and a few more sources.

To many people of the United States (and around the world), the South is its own distinct entity with unique cultural nuances, food and dialect. Upon closer investigation we find that, just like any other locale, the South’s identity is the mixture and steeping of various factors coming together over time. Anthony Cavender, writing in Folk Medicine in South Appalachia, reminds the reader that “[t]here never was nor is there now a variety of folk medicine unique to Appalachia.” (preface). The distinction of southern herbal medicine is not solely created by piecing together the ethnic beliefs and where to get viagra'>where to get viagra practices of the people of the South: the Cherokee, European immigrants (largely Irish, English, Scottish and French), and African slaves implanted in the south and through the Caribbean. It is also due to understanding of health and medicine of the groups of people at the time they settled in the South, geographical isolation and relative economic misfortune (Cavender, 24).
Although there were differences in the European folk medicine and Native American systems around the time of European immigration, one obvious commonality was the reliance on plant medicines. During the Civil War, Confederate doctors working in the battlefield expanded their use of herbal medicines to what they could learn from local folk herbalists, as the only common medicines to which they had regular access were whisky and quinine, and both were quite expensive (Jacobs). Many of the remedies used during the war are still used frequently in the South by herbalists (and indeed all over the States) and include red oak bark and satyaedu.org sodium bicarbonate used as antiseptics, slippery elm, wahoo and salt employed as emollients, poppy and nightshades for pain, boneset and pleurisy root for intermittent fever, mayapple or peach tree leaves for stomach upset, mustard seeds for pneumonia, black haw, black cohosh and partridge berry for women’s complaints (as thousands of women assisted in the camps), and so on (Jacobs).

The folk herbal practitioners used these herbs and more, as they were never as dependent on imported herbs or manufactured patent medicines like quinine, belladonna, senna or opium. Like many in the Western world, the herbalists had in their ancestral knowledge base the Greek Humoral system of hot/cold, damp/dry. Being dependent on the natural world around them for food, shelter, clothing and medicine, the folk herbalists observed the way the sap fell and rose in the trees with the changing seasons and http://chaewebdesign.com/cheap-levitra-no-prescription applied their observations to the humoral system to develop a system of blood typology (Light). Wood quotes a saying in the south,

“In the spring collect the spicy, warm sassafras root bark to thin the blood; in the fall collect the mucilaginous bark to thicken the blood” (13).

Blood typology is a systems of energetics, one system of many used around the world. On the surface, energetic systems like the Ayurvedic doshas, Chinese Five elements, Native American four directions, Greek humoral, physiomedical cross and Southern blood typology are systematically different, yet they all share a treatment philosophy of looking at underlying patterns in an individual (often called constitution) formulate a diagnosis directed by the person, not the disease.
Energetics do not just address an individual’s diagnosis, but also extend to the remedy. Energetic treatment protocol can include taste (sour, sweet, pungent, acrid, bitter, meaty, salty, and so on), temperature (hot, warm, cool, cold), humidity (dry, moist), directionality (up or down, in or out), and tone or general state of being (constricted, tense, relaxed, atrophy), and can be gross (physical) or subtle (energetic) in nature.
Imagine, for example, that a person’s pattern of disease exhibits one of the four Greek humors, heat, as an underlining pathology. To counteract the heat and assist the healing process, a practitioner administers a cooling agent to sooth the irritated tissue and increase the body’s capacity to cool itself. As a remedy, slightly sweet and sour hawthorn berry is given to help cool and constrict the tissues back to a healthy tone. Red or blue pigmented fruits like hawthorn berries contain high amounts of flavonoids, a particular class of chemical constituents that seem to have an affinity for the blood, heart, capillaries and vessels (Bove). The sourness of hawthorn berries, like most other fruits, are thought to tighten, cool, promote salivation and thus cooling. In Western traditional medicine and herbalism, energetics often extend to include the actions of plants (astringent, tonic, diaphoretic, syptic, ect…) which then can further be extrapolated to chemical constituents, thus bridging Western medical traditions, American herbal medicine and modern biomedicine views.

Sources:
Bove, Mary. “Four Super Fruits”. Medicines from the Earth lecture notes, 2010.
Cavender, Anthony. Folk Medicine in Southern Appalachia.
Jacobs, Joseph. “Drug Conditions during the War between the States”.  Southern Historical Society Papers, Col XXXIII. January-December 1905. civilwarhome.com/drugghsp.htm.
Light, Phyllis. “Southern herbalism: Southern Herbalism, My Story”. An article from: New     Life Journal [eDoc/Amazon Short].
Light, Phyllis. Lecture notes: Southern Folk Herbalism. 2007.
Matthews, Holly F. “Rootwork: Description of Ethnomedical System in the South.” Southern Medical Journal, July 1987, Vol. 80, No. 7.
Wood, Matthew. The Earthwise Herbal: A Complete Guide to New World Medicinal
Plants.

Physician, heal thyself

December 31st, 2010 § 2 comments § permalink

I am at the end of a much-needed three week break from school. Of course, before the end of the term I was already plotting and what is the cost of viagra'>what is the cost of viagra planning all the wonderful super important and constructive things I would do with the immense amount of free time. Then break arrived. I spent the first three days still doing homework, since I came down with a weird 24-hour bug during finals and fell behind. After that, I threw away my list of things to accomplish and undertook a new plan: relax, rejuvenate and have fun.

This is an herbal blog, and yes, there are plenty of herbs for rejuvenation. In another entry, I’ll share my two allies of the moment for just that. But as I grow, so does my relationship with health and my thoughts on healing. All the herbs in the world can’t replace a decent night’s sleep, healthy relationships, creative expression, faith and optimism. Herbs are just one of the many tools we are able to graciously call upon for nutrition (literally and figuratively) and balance. My point here is that taking a break from engaging with herbalism on an educational level might just help me be a better herbalist later.

Some people from my school have studied over break. That simply amazes me; you couldn’t pay me to study right now! Before I got to school, I thought that I would be an incredible superwoman of productivity. I thought of all the things I wanted to do with every area of life. I took notes from Portland blogger Eric at Deepest Health about his year of sagely living in hopes that I could do it all, too.

Then I realized that we each have our own path and ways of doing things, and while I seek inspiration and it's great! female levitra insight from others, I have no need to try to be like anyone but myself. Things will unfold when they ought to, I need not push my way through the joy of working alongside plants and judge success on how many blog entries I write a day, how many clients I have, how many herb books I read or species I identify.

This is the start of my schooling, one term down eleven to go! I figure now is a good time set the tone for rejuvenation so when I return to intellectual zone, I’ll be ready. Rosemary Gladstar once commented that our society doesn’t take time for convalescence and that if we had our heads on straight we would do just that. Just think of all the people who don’t take their sick and vacation days off from work. And if people do take vacation time, it is sometimes spent doing work around the house rather than relaxing or doing something special.

“Physician, heal thyself” comes to mind, as does the saying that “the cobbler wears the worst shoes”. During the first weeks of school, I turned these phrases around and held them against the institution of education, thinking in a huff, “how am I supposed to be a good healer and take care of myself if I have to study all the time”? It took a while, but I changed that statement from an accusation to a point of reflection. Instead of getting angry about it, I answered my own question. I think we all know what we need to do to be healthy. They answer isn’t flashy, too time consuming or expensive; eat right, sleep, keep up with your tasks but don’t overdo it, recreate, exercise in ways that are a joy and value your family and friends, and so on.

We also are just as aware of the things we know we need to stop doing. You don’t need a doctor to tell you if something – whether it be a food or behavior – isn’t agreeing with your biology and buy levitra australia life. Can it really be that simple? Do what what serves you, stop doing what is harmful? I say it’s a pretty solid start to being congruent or in alignment with your life.

Yes, it is difficult to stay balanced and healthy during school, but how is it any different with our future clientele and their lives? If I can do my best to learn to take care of my health now, then I can be like a physician who has taken her own good advice, or a cobbler who has taken the time to craft quality shoes

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